Grades on Kiddom reflect student’s overall understanding of skills assessed. Let’s explore how overall student mastery is calculated. 

1. Unweighted

All grades carry equal weight in calculating student mastery. This is the default setting. 

What does mastery mean? The Marzano mastery scale is 1-4, as shown below.

Learn more about Marzano Mastery

How are grades calculated when assignments with points are graded using rubrics?

Student Scores for rubrics are shown below:

Rubric #1 Score: 2 of 4
Student receives 50% of points for this rubric = 5 of 10 points.

Rubric #2 Score: 4 of 4
Student receives 100% of points for this rubric = 10 of 10 points.


Rubric #3 Score: 1 of 4

Student receives 25% of points for this rubric = 2.5 of 10 points.

Add Rubric points together: 5 points + 10 points + 2.5 points = 17.5

Student score: 17.5 of 30 points possible.

Student score: 58% of rubric points.

Mastery level: Developing for standards attached.


2. Max Law

The highest score achieved is accepted for the standard assessed. If a student is assessed multiple times for a standard, the highest score achieved represents mastery of that particular standard.

The more times students are assessed for a given standard, the stronger this data becomes.

If Max Law is chosen, student mastery reports display the highest score achieved for the standard. Above, three assignments were given on one standard and the highest score becomes the mastery level. In this case, “Exceeding” represents this student’s performance level for standard 8.EE.7.  


3. Weighted by Assignment Type 

Choose varying assignment weights to influence overall student mastery. Divide 100% of the total weight across assignment types to affect mastery as you desire.

Overall Student Mastery with Weighted Assignments: Approaching Mastery

If there is no data available for an assignment type you’ve weighted, weights will recalculate for the assignment types contributing data. 

Please reach out to our team with any questions regarding calculating mastery grades.

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